Travel diaries

Travel to Australia: Uluru and start the Rock Tour

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New account of the newspaper of trip to australia we did in August 2017. We left the city of Melbourne to fly to red navel from Australia: Uluru. Here begins "The Rock Tour"!

We got up very soon that morning. We left Melbourne to fly to central Australia, we were going to Ayers Rock. When we planned the trip to Australia, we decided that Uluru was an essential visit for us. There were only two small problems: it is in the middle of the desert and reaching Uluru and getting around the area is not cheap. Therefore, in the end we hire an adventure tour to go from Uluru to Alice Springs in three days.

We take the Skybus at the Southern Cross station in Melbourne to Tullmarine-Melbourne airport. Domestic flights depart from terminal 4 and we were surprised that half terminal was from Jetstar and that the billing you had to do it yourself in a machine. You even had to leave your suitcase on the conveyor belt yourself.

At 9:30 a.m. our flight to Ayers Rock departed on time. The Jetstar plane took approximately 2 and a half hours to arrive and, as we approached the airstrip, we could see a beautiful view of Uluru from the air (seat 7A). Ayers Rock airport is very small and has been operating for a few years. On the way out we met Reid, our guide from The Rock Tour, who would accompany us the following days. On our flight from Melbourne we had reached five people who were going to do the tour, the remaining 16 components of the group were going to arrive a couple of hours later from Sydney.

We left our luggage on the trailer, climbed into the minibus that looked like it had traveled millions of kilometers and headed to Uluru National Park. We parked at the Cultural Center and the guide gave us lunch: a vegetable sandwich with sweet ham. He told us that after lunch we would go directly to Uluru. And so we did. He left us at the beginning of the "base walk" path that surrounds the base of this gigantic rock and gave us some simple directions on the route. Basically, that we would start the circular path around Uluru and that he would pick us up about 45 minutes later, when he had the entire group, to start the day's visits. Or at least we understood that.

And we started to walk. It was sunny, but not asphyxiating heat. In August it is winter in Australia and in the downtown area it is a pleasant temperature during the day. However, at night temperatures plummet, in the style of Namibia.

The path that runs through the base of Uluru is almost 11 km long and runs in about three and a half hours. It is completely flat, so it has no difficulty. We started touring it in the Warayuki area. By the way, Uluru is a sacred place for Aboriginal people and in some areas you can't take pictures.

Although the white man set foot in Uluru in the 19th century (Ernest Giles, 1872), for the aborigines it is a place of special significance since the dawn of time. For the people of Anangu, the enormous rock was created by ancestral beings and the caves that can be seen in the rock represent those spirits. The Anangu have two different languages: Yankunytjatjara and Pitjantjatjara.

The 45 minutes passed and since Reid did not appear, we kept walking, thinking that the ones he had to pick up from Sydney would come late. So we continue along the path until we reach Kapi Mutitjulu, a water source (kapi) emanating from the base of Uluru. This spring is sacred, a place where respect is requested during the visit.

Nearby is the Kulpi Mutijulu, a cave in which the Anangu family clans camped for generations. Traditionally, men engaged in hunting and women looked after children and collected fruits from the bushes (mai). During the night, stories were told around the fire, they gave lessons and lessons to the children and they painted murals on the rock. Even today, the tradition is passed from parents to children orally and that is why there is very little written information about the aboriginal culture of the area.

The legend of Kuniya and Liru

Minyma Kuniya, the Python woman, came from the east, near Erldunda. He felt a bad sensation in his stomach and knew something bad was happening. He must go to Uluru. Kinya created the Inma (ceremony) to bind all her eggs together. He took them to Uluru on a ring around his neck and left them in Kuniya Piti.

Meanwhile, Kuniya's nephew also came to Uluru from the opposite side. A war band of liru men (venomous snake) was chasing him from a place near Kata Tjuta. He had broken the laws in his lands and had the mission to punish him.

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